The Hyper Loop, what’s in the Azure Cloud for you, and a book that moved me

HyperloopWant to travel from San Francisco to Los Angeles in 30 minutes?  We have the technology and it’s real.  Elon Musk leads Tesla, Solar City and Hyper Loop.  They’ve successfully tested Hyper Loop technology and are now building the breaking systems, cabins, and the tracks.  The biggest challenge by far is the right of way issues.  Hyper Loop is cabin in a tube that can be above ground or below that travels in a vacuum at speeds over 1,000 mph (faster than the speed of sound).  This will be available in 2020, that’s in four years!!!  Watch the video:  Hyper loop – https://youtu.be/GiYb_0wOWqY

Hard to believe it’s football time again.  So what’s the delay in Johnny Manziel going to the Raiders?  What a perfect fit.  And the Broncos trade for Mark Sanchez?  Why?  I love this quote from Mike Tyson, “Everyone has a plan ’till they get punched in the mouth.”

amanda-schweickertAnd at least give Amanda Schweickert an A for creativity. The 28-year-old was pulled over south of Buffalo, N.Y., after sheriff’s deputies say they saw an odd-looking license plate on the back of her car. Why it looked so strange: It was made of cardboard and painted to look like a New York license plate. Well, sort of. See for yourself.

Azure stackMicrosoft Azure is the future.  Here’s a great chart.  You only pay for what you use, there is no start up investment, no maintenance, and it’s cheap.  Reach out to me to better understand how you can best leverage the paradigm of Cloud computing.

ernie pyleOn the serious side of things, I recently read The Story of World War II by Donald Miller and it knocked my socks off.  It’s mostly first person accounts of the soldiers and the press (like Ernie Pyle) from WW II.  In case you don’t think this perspective is much different, think of it this way…  There is no way a soldier has the same perspective as a commanding General who is leading miles from the action.  The General’s daily report might be something like, “we had an excellent day and succeeded in accomplishing all of our objectives while sustaining minimal casualties and loss of equipment.  The soldier’s report will always be different.  He will have seen some of his friends die, killed some of the enemy, he’s almost deaf from the concussion of artillery shells and perhaps he was injured as they advanced up a road or into a village.

Some lesser known facts.

  • We lost 188,000 US soldiers taking Sicily
  • On D-Day, the initial landings in Normandy we lost 4,900 soldiers
  • When the US 8th Air Force first engaged in occupied Europe – they lost 17% of this force on the first day.  On their 2nd day of combat they lost 25% of their numbers.  This was considered a success.
  • We attacked Hamburg, Germany’s 2nd largest city in July 1943.  German dead (mostly women, children and the elderly) totaled 45,000 and over 400,000 were made homeless.  In ten days’ German losses were more than Great Britain’s losses in the entire war.
Boeing B-17F

Boeing B-17F formation over Schweinfurt, Germany, on Aug. 17, 1943. (U.S. Air Force photo)

The Schweinfurt–Regensburg mission was an air combat battle in World War II. It was a strategic bombing attack flown by B-17 Flying Fortresses in August 1943, it was conceived as an ambitious plan to cripple the German aircraft industry (Schweinfurt factories produced 50% of Germany’s ball bearings which was considered to be their Achilles heel).

An account from the book is as follows of a solitary shot up B-17 limping home to England.

Someone on the plane radioed the tower, “Hello Lazy Fox, this G for George calling Lazy Fox, will you give me landing instructions please?  Pilot and co-pilot dead, 2 engines feathered, fire in the radio room, vertical stabilizer gone, no flaps, no breaks, crew bailed out, bombardier flying the ship. Give me landing instructions.

The reply came a few seconds later, “I hear you G for George, here are your landing instructions.

Solider, “Repeat slowly please, repeat slowly

Tower, “Our Father, Who art in heaven

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